Talari Networks, Inc. today announced Equity Office has deployed Talari’s adaptive private networking (APN) for WAN Virtualization appliances at two corporate data centers and 40 remote offices to ensure high-availability networks for voice and data applications. By using Talari’s WAN Virtualization technology, the commercial real estate leader has reduced its annual connectivity spending by 50 percent, boosted its bandwidth, and expects to achieve ROI in ten months.

WAN Virtualization (using Talari’s APN appliances) aggregates two or more IP connections (e.g., DSL, cable, fiber and Ethernet over copper, etc.) into a single logical network, continuously monitoring the performance of every network path between the remote sites and Equity Office’s Chicago headquarters to ensure a more reliable and predictable data and VoIP network.

Equity Office uses a hub-and-spoke network configuration that hosts centralized business applications including real-time VoIP, interactive Citrix, and Exchange Mail. Prior to Talari, each office was connected via MPLS service by at least a single T-1 line, with several of the larger offices having two or three T-1s. Each office had a backup DSL link.

“Our network functioned reasonably well most of the time, but not always,” says Chavdar Momchev, director of voice and communications for Equity Office. “During MPLS outages while operating on DSL backup, we’d receive complaints because users were without sufficient access to the applications they needed to be productive.”

After researching several products, the company selected Talari because unlike competitive alternatives, Talari’s WAN Virtualization makes sub-second traffic engineering decisions on a packet-by-packet basis, which is especially critical for latency-sensitive applications like VoIP and video. Real-time VoIP packets are given priority over other types, such as email or file transfers, and are always transmitted over the path with the lowest loss and jitter characteristics.

The new WAN with Talari’s WAN Virtualization ensures that when one link fails, remaining links in the “virtual network” pick up the slack to ensure that outages don’t impact users.

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